Entertainment Hub Thesis Statement

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Clean Venice: Infrastructure & Place-Making in Venice, Italy, Nicholas Musilli

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Open Source Architecture: Redefining Residential Architecture in Islamabad, Mariam Yaqub

Submissions from 2016

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Continuation of a Life Worth Living: Empathetic Design for the Alzheimer’s Community, Leslie Hulbert

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An Architecture of Movement: the New Headquarters for USA Dance, Bethany Robertson

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A Floating Community: a ‘Platform’ for Future Sustainable Development, Christopher M. Rossi

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Redefining Transportation Culture: a New Union Station for Los Angeles, Pawel Honc

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The Motor City – Stimulating Architecture, Jacob Levine

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The Modern Urban Neighborhood: the Role of Dwelling in Neighborhood Revitalization, Zachary Nelson

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From the Border: Migrant Youth shelter, Alexandra Reilly

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On Track: Integrated Efficiency for Equestrian Architecture, Anthony Scerbo

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Reclaimed Identity/Innov - Roc: the Innovation Hub + Revitalization of High Falls, Rochester, NY, Justin M. Dufresne

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Architecture for Ruins: How Building New Can Showcase the Old in Barboursville, VA, Alison B. Fredericks

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Logothium: Reunification and Improvement of the Community through Logos, Karin J. Hirose

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Architecture of Illusion: an Investigation into Cinematic Deception in Camden Town, London, Kathryn Klesseck

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A Commensalist Architecture: Intervening with History to Revitalize Asbury Park, NJ, Caitlin Osepchuk

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Architecture of Rehabilitation: Rehabilitation and Reinsertion Center for Adolescent Offenders, Patricio Solines

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Cohousing and the Greater Community: Re-establishing Identity in Taunton’s Weir Village, Andrew Kremzier

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Humility and Homelessness: a Housing Continuum, Jessica MacDonald

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Awareness at a Threshold: Urban Exchange through Public Space, Matthew Spears

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The real, the spectacle, and the in-between: architecture as a stage for reality, Chelsea Adelson

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Environmental Architecture: Environmental Discovery Center on the Woonasquatucket River, Nathan Bonaiuto

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Aesthetically Pleasing: Rehabilitating a Community, Joseph D’Oria

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Boston_Sound_Center, Michael Frase

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Layered Transparency: the Performance of Exposure, the Exposure of Performance, Colin Gadoury

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Nature and Architecture: a Holistic Response, Jarrod Martin

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Community Reclamation: the Hybrid Building, Laura Maynard

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New Urban Living: High-Rise Vertical Farming in a Mixed Use Building, Boston, MA, Zachary Silvia

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Framing Emotive and Perspective Space : the Sundance Center for the Exhibition and Study of Film, Joshua Stiling

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LAM: Laughing My Architecture Of, Elizabeth Straub

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Union Wadding Artist Complex: Pawtucket, Rhode Island, Jennifer Turcotte

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Invention Center: a Building of Inventions, Jonathan T. Archbald

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Reusable Building Systems, Daniel Boyle

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Working with Nature, Carolyn Brown

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Creating Social Networks: Resettlement Center for Burmese Refugees, Kelly Lynne Clarke

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An Architecture Of Connection, Jessie Renee Davey-Mallo

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Graffiti Gallery, Mike Delvalle

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Waterfront Revitalization: Bridgeport Aquarium and Waterfront Promenade, Ryan Devenney

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Biomimicry: Architecture that Imitates Nature’s Functions, Forms and Parts, Kostika Spaho

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Programmatic Overlays: A Park/Cemetery in Jersey City, NJ, Lawrence Zarpaylic

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Re-active Architecture: Exploring the Japanese educational Experience, John J. Baker

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Urban [BOXSCAPE], Brad W. Bolte

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Design as a Tool for Architectural + Social Development: the Kalighat Women’s Resource Center, Lindsay Brugger

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F.F.A: Forensic + Funerary Architecture, Michael P. Cafro

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Creating Community: Mixed Use Development in New Bedford, MA, Matthew J.B. Cate

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Redefining the Rural Experience: Change for the People of the Appalachian Mountains, Magoffin County Crafts, Social, and Health Services Center Gifford, Kentucky, Katelyn Chapin

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A Spiritual Journey: Redefining the 21st Century Catholic Church, Kevin R. Correia

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Buffalo Outer Harbor Quays, Ryan Decker

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Hatfield Community Center: Hatfield, Massachusetts, Patrick Dominov

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Homeless Rehabilitation Center at LaSalette Shrine in Attleboro, MA, Reid Evan Ennis

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A Catalyst for Urban Renewal: Reservoir Number Three Environmental History Museum, Brian R. Fontaine

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Lost Angeles: Los Angeles, California, USA, Irena Gagulic

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Blending Architecture with Nature: the Old Man in the Mountain, Rick Hamme

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PMR, Psychosocial Multicultural Rehabilitation: A Place of Peace and Compassion for Child Soldiers of Post War Trauma, Alyssa Keating

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The 21st Century Civic Identity: Redefining the Small Town City Hall, LeEllen M. Lewis

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Accessible Architecture: Creating Possibilities for Adults with Cerebral Palsy, Caitlin M. Mayo

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Adaptive Housing: Transformation and Growth in the Urban Environment, Kevin Mowatt

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Architecture as an Educational Tool: University of Connecticut School of Architecture, Nicholas Mundo

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125th and Amsterdam: Creating Spaces for Social Interaction, Joshua Payne

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Tune in: Berklee College of Music, Center for Music Technology, Boston, Massachusetts, Nicholas Proto

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Contradiction and Duality within the City: the House of Arts and Culture, Andrei Sdrula

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The Ocular orientation Center: Using the Built Environment as a Means of Wayfinding, Kara Lane Smolca

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Community Infrastructure: a transformation of the New Orleans industrial canal, Nicholas Thornton

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Sky-field: a Vertical Farming Solution for Urban New York, Justin White

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Rising Architecture, Erica M. Wiggin

Submissions from 2009

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Integrating Infrastructures: Redefining Ecological + Man-made Systems, Bio-remediation Facility, Woonsocket, Rhode Island, Nicole C. Arvanites

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Identity Factory: the Mass Production of the Masses, Greenpoint, Brooklyn, Peter W. Bartash

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Density: an Additive Process, Oscar Sam Boyko

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Architecture Raising Awareness of the Wider World: A Centre for Haiti in Boston, Thomas Burns

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Soundview Center for Acceptance: Youths Learning From Each Other, Amanda Cerqueira

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Bridging the Gap: a Symbiotic Approach, Nicholas Czarniecki

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Strabismal Existence, Jordan Dubreuil

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Allston Artist Village, Meaghan Earner

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The Right Ascension Children's Center: Orphaned Refugee Rehabilitation, Newton, MA, Jonathan Fox

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Movement Architecture: an Investigation into the Manipulation of Movement through Form and Space, Rachel Hampton

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Mother Building: Communal Architecture Incubator, Richmond Downey Jeffrey

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Reuniting a Community: the Stephen Kaplanis YMCA, Michael R. Kozlowski

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Dignified Housing: a Community in North Conway, New Hampshire, Christian Lanciaux

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National Culture and Entertainment Center: Iconographic Architecture, Hung Quoc Le

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Learning Through Nature: Mount Holyoke Environmental Research and Education Center, Sari M. Lipnick

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Volvo Museum of Automotive History: Boston Massachusetts, C. Patrick McCabe

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Center for the Creation and Performance of the Arts, Dennis P. McGowan

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Closer: Designing a Manufacturing Facility for the Zuni Pueblo Solar Energy Reinvestment Initiative, Seth Van Nostrand

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Vertical Communities: an Alternative to Suburban Sprawl, Zev O’Brien-Gould

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Adaptive Reuse of the Big Box Store, Mark C. Roderick

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Re-conceptualizing Performance and Event in the Public Realm: a Multicultural Funeral Home, Ashley Rodrigues

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Awakening Experience: Amish Youth and the Search for a Modern Identity, Nicole Secinaro

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Fort Point Channel: Maglev Transit Hub and South Station Expansion Master Plan, Steven Seminelli

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Social Rejuvenation: A New Community Center, Lancaster, PA, John Snavely

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Newport Aquarium Oceanic Research and Discovery Center: to Further Our Knowledge of the Ocean, Steven R. Toohey

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Living in the Spectrum: Autistic Children Center, Jennifer Villegas

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Redefining Branding in Architecture: Case Study, Westside Railyards Development New York City, USA, Andrew Vuono

Submissions from 2008

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Revitalizing Liberty: Creating a Train Station—Community Center—Business Incubator, Magan M. Baxter

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Pushing the Green Envelope: Education & Research Center for Sustainability, Emma Fischer

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Empathetic Design: Transitional Shelter, Anne Marie Loiselle

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Community Wellness Center: Providence, Rhode Islan, Eva Marie Mercurio

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Reconnecting Schools and Neighborhoods: A proposal for School Centered Community Revitalization in Baltimore Maryland, Cody Miller

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A Model School in Massachusetts: Preschool, Kindergarten, First Grade, Robin Nichols

Submissions from 2007

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Envoking the emotions through the experience of space; integration of an outreach community center and the First United Methodist Church of Hightstown, Elizabeth Dicecco

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Reconnecting society: a home for elderly living, Cheryl Downie

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A puzzle piece epidemic, Nicole Gerard

 

Roman Entertainment

  • Length: 1009 words (2.9 double-spaced pages)
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Roman Entertainment

     There were many things the Romans did for entertainment. Even though this

entertainment was cruel and brutal it satisfied the Roman's need for excitment and relaxation. In

Rome most people loved to watch others suffer and fight to their death. While others loved to go

and get a good laugh at the theater or relax and talk about politics at the baths. In the city the

state provided most of the entertainment. Outside of the city the people made their own

entertainment.

     One of the places that the state provided for entertainment was the Colosseum. The

Colosseum could seat up to about 50,000 people, upper and lower class. The lower class and

women had to sit in the highest level of the Colosseum. The rich and upper class had the best

seating and the easiest access to the Colosseum. Even though many people think that the

Colosseum was used just for gladiatorial battles, the Colosseum was also filled water so the

navy could work on its strategies. The gladiatorial battles usually took place from sunrise to

sunset. The gladiators not only fought against other gladiators but also against wild beast such

as lions, tigers, and many other dangerous animals. In the beginning, slaves were the main

fighters in the arena. Then they realized that the slave population was not enough to continue the

battles; so many criminals were sent to the gladiatorial schools. Since the criminals were getting

sent to the gladiatorial schools to become a gladiator, criminals thought twice before commiting a

crime.

     Another state provided form of entertainment was chariot racing. The chariot races were

held in what was called The Circus Maximus. The chariot races held in the Circus Maximus were

considered the most popular form of entertainment. The Circus Maximus' entertainment was

much like the Colosseum, a visitor could come and stay all day. The Circus Maximus could seat

as many as 255,000 spectators. Men and women could sit together, but there was reserved

seating for the Emporer, senators, knights, Vestal virgins, and women of the Imperial family. On

the day of the event, there were about ten to twenty four races. Just like today there were many

precautions taken before each race. The horses and the drivers were both checked to ensure

that they had not been drugged, and were able to compete in the games. After each race the

crowd was amused with acrobats, rope-dancers, and trick-riders.

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Entertainment         Roman         Lower Class         Upper Class         Chariot         Colosseum         Maximus         Circus         Races         Visitor        




These amusements are the

same amusements that go on in present day circuses. The overall winner of the races was

decided in the final race, which each preliminary winner would compete.

     Another place Romans went for entertainment was the theater. The Roman theater was

an important part of religious festivals. Theater performanes were given in honor of Greek and

Roman gods. Although the theater was respected, it did not provide the Romans with the same

intensity as the chariot races and the gladiator battles. Admission into the theater was free, so the

upper and the lower class could come and enjoy. The seating was a on first come, first serve

basis. But the best seats were resevered for the upper class. The Romans enjoyed comedies most

of all. Costumes, masks, and wigs were an important part of Roman theater. Costumes colors

told spectators who the actors were portraying. In their society women were not actresses,

female roles were played by men dressed up as females.

     The most relaxing entertainment the people of Rome had was going to the baths. They

went to the baths for healing or just to get clean. The baths were huge buildings built at public

expense or by rich emporers who wished ti impress their subjects. Sometimes rich Romans who

were trying to gain popularity paid entry for a whole day for anyone wishing to visit the baths.

Most of the baths were free but those baths that had a fee had the fee to keep out the slaves and


the poor who could not afford it. Some of the bathing habits of the richer part of the Roman

civilizations were very lavish. Roman men would bathe in wine and women sometimes in milk.

The bath house was used to meet friends for a chat, to exchange gossip, exercise or just to clean

yourself up.

     All over Rome, men practiced riding, fencing, wrestling, throwing, and swimming. In the

country, men went hunting and fishing. At home, men played ball before dinner, which were

games of throwing and catching. Ball-playing was popular among the Romans, and they often

spent their morning exercises playing games on the fields or ball-courts. The Romans enjoyed a

variety of ball games, including Handball, Trigon, Soccer, Field Hockey, Harpasta, Phaininda,

Episkyros, and Catch and any other games that the children would invent.

     These events that took place back in ancient Rome played a major role in Roman society.

The thing these events affect the most is the women. Back in the ancient Rome women were not

able to do hardly anything. They were considered lower class. When they went to watch a

gladiatorial event at the Colossium and a chariot race at the Circus Maximus they always had to

sit in the higher levels with the lower class citizens. In the theaters women was not even able to

act as females in the plays, they got men to dress up as women and play them for them. Women

were also not able to participate in riding, fencing, wrestling, throwing, and swimming. Drinking

wine was part of daily life. In the very early days, women were not even allowed to drink wine.

Their husband might kiss them on the mouth to see if they had been drinking. If a husband

believed that his wife was drinking she could have been severely beaten.

     Roman society was probably affected the most of any other thing at this time. It took a

while before these cruel and barbaric events that took place to become outlawed. In closing

Roman entertainment was cruel and barbaric, but yet filled with laughter and relaxation.



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